WMCCA Newsletter


WEST MONTGOMERY COUNTY
CITIZENS ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER

An Archive of past newsletters, back to the January 2003 issue, is now available on this website.

May 2016


YES, It Often Is and Should Be Political

President's Letter - by Susanne Lee

WMCCA was called out by Montgomery County Council members during the April 18th meeting of the Planning, Housing and Economic Committee for somehow creating problems and causing sewer policy to be a “political” issue. Politics is defined by the Cambridge English Dictionary as “the activities of the government, members of law-making organizations, or people who try to influence the way a country is governed.” Keep in mind that WMCCA studiously avoids engaging in partisan politics. However, we take very seriously our role in communicating, educating, and yes influencing legislators about the impacts - good and bad - of decisions being made by governmental officials about our communities. Our primary focus is most often on environmental impacts, but always on the facts, sound science, and applicable laws and regulations.

Rather than shying away from the political process, we encourage our members to participate. The more light that shines on the process, the better the decision making. That is why we have been so adamant about disseminating critical, fact-based, information about the Glen Hills sewer amendments and policy. On May 9th, the County Council will vote on funding for a Master Plan Amendment to allow sewer expansion into Glen Hills, an environmentally sensitive low density area. Although done in the context of one neighborhood, this major change in sewer policy will have impacts on low density areas throughout the County. It comes on the heels of the Council’s recent text amendment declaring septic systems built prior to 1975 to be public health concerns triggering sanitary surveys and potential declarations as public health problem areas. These new sewer policies have grave implications for rural and low-density residential, watershed protection, and Agricultural Reserve areas everywhere in the County. They will likely impact almost all property owners now on septic. Such a fundamental change in land use protection must be done within the context of the Countywide Water and Sewer Plan with a fully transparent public process open to all. It should not be buried in a Master Plan process designed to focus only on the homeowners on septic in Glen Hills.

Extending public sewer lines into rural areas is a virtual guarantee of increased density and pollution of our clean drinking water supplies. The cost of sewering 1 and 2 acre lots is excessive per house and the environmental benefits are non-existent and could be made worse with sewer—both in construction and later when there is a leak or a failed pump station. Moreover, putting such areas in such a service category makes them vulnerable to requests for rezoning to higher densities, claiming a change has occurred in the character of the neighborhood and that the cost of service is too high unless houses are closer together. The low-density zoning and continuing use of septic systems are complementary and mutually reinforcing. Take away one and you undermine the other.

So yes, this process must be political. As a result, we are working with the Audubon Naturalist Society and the Montgomery Countryside Alliance in urging the County Council to:

  1. Address any Glen Hills septic-sewer policy issues within the Countywide Water Supply and Sewerage Systems Plan.
  2. Keep Glen Hills out of the Planning Board's Work Plan; and,
  3. Renew and reaffirm the County's commitment to protecting drinking water supply watersheds, the Agricultural Reserve and other rural and low-density areas, through continued and strengthened use of the entire range of protection tools, laws, and policies, including those that prohibit placement of public sewer lines in sensitive watersheds. It is an environmental benefit to utilize and maintain functioning septic and other waste treatment systems. These tools are vital in retaining agricultural, rural residential, drinking water supply, and other low-density areas of our County.

ELECTION OF WMCCA OFFICERS AND BOARD: The Nominating Committee proposes the following slate of Officers and Directors to the membership for a vote at our May 11th meeting. Nominations may also be made from the floor.


President: CAROL VAN DAM FALK
Immediate past President: SUSANNE LEE
President Elect: GINNY BARNES
Vice President: MARK ISREAL
Treasurer: KATHY PETTIT
Secretary: BARBARA BROWN
Newsletter: NANCY MADDEN
Directors serving second year of a two-year term: GEORGE BARNES
Nominees for a two-year term: ALISON MROHS, BARBARA HOOVER, KEN BAWER
Nominees for a one-year term: JOHN YASSIN, JILL PHILLIPS


Help support our efforts in defending the Master Plan. Renew or become a new member of WMCCA. Look for your renewal notice in the mail or go to our website to download a membership form or join using PayPal: www.wmcca.org

West Montgomery County Citizens Association Newsletter
P. O. Box 59335
Potomac, MD 20854-9335
President - Susanne Lee, 301-956-4535
Website – WMCCA.org - Peter Poggi, Newsletter Editor – Nancy Madden


The Newsletter is published monthly, and the Board of Directors meets each month. We welcome any suggestions for upcoming meeting topics and ways to further utilize our web site (www.wmcca.org).

Check the web site for information on issues we are working on.